Real people, real events

People
 It's always fun to include the odd real character in a piece of historical fiction. Done well, it adds to the sense of reality; whether this has been achieved in The Bodysnatcher's Apprentice I will leave to you to decide! 
  The obvious real person is Jeremy Bentham, (1748 - 1832) a man with extraordinarily modern views for the time. He was the founder of Utilitarianism: ‘the greatest happiness of the greatest number is the only right and proper end of government’. He was a believer in universal rights, equality of men and women, and Sanitary reform. He did travel to Paris in 1825, mainly to seek help for a skin condition, but also to lecture and study medical practice there.
At the end of his life he was indeed able to keep an eye on William: his mummified body was preserved by Southwood Smith (see below)  and later put on display at University College London.

   He is not the only real character in the story; Sarah Savery was matron of St Thomas' Hospital from 1816 until 1840. 


Mr North is based on a number of contemporary characters, such as Thomas Southwood Smith (1788 - 1861), a physician and friend of Bentham.  In 1827 he published The Use of the Dead to the Living, a pamphlet which argued that the current system of burial was a wasteful use of bodies that could otherwise be used for dissection by the medical profession.  There is also something of the surgeon, Astley Cooper, (1768 - 1841) about Mr North; he lectured at St Thomas's to, amongst others, John Keats. 

Events

Pole and Thornton's Bank, (full name Pole, Thornton, Free, Down & Scott) mentioned at the end of chapter 21, failed in December of 1825.  In
Marianne Thornton: A domestic biography, 1797–1887, by E. M. Forster, we read that Pole, Thornton’s managing partner “had been inexcusably imprudent in not keeping more cash in the House, but relying on (the bank’s) credit…which would enable them to borrow whenever they pleased.”  
   So, nothing changes. (Pole and Thornton's is mentioned on the archive website of the Royal Bank of Scotland as an 'associated bank'.  No comment . . .) 



                              

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